What Does the Healthy Version of You Look Like and Feel Like?

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Maybe you start to make healthy changes and then get stuck?

Or perhaps you don’t even know where to begin?  For so many, feeling unwell or unhealthy preoccupies their thoughts, choices and ultimately their body. It may be a feeling that you have come to expect each day. Most folks generally know that their food and other lifestyle choices affect how they feel day in and day out. 

But generally knowing is far different from living a confident, healthy lifestyle.  Not only will you feel better but you can also significantly lower your risk for many chronic diseases, even cancers by changing up a few things –and learning which food choices and lifestyle changes matter the most for you. Everyone’s biochemistry and physical make up is just a bit different.  My aim is to help you find the food and lifestyle choices that work best for you.

Do you have any of the following?

  • Digestive troubles:  bloating, cramps, constipation, diarrhea, or food intolerances.
  • Risky cardiac markers: elevated triglycerides, low HDL’s, high blood pressure.
  • Pre-diabetes, diabetes, elevated blood sugars or insulin resistance
  • Difficulty losing weight.

Do you?

  • Wonder about gluten, FODMAPs or low carbohydrate eating?
  • Struggle with any GI disorder or cardiovascular risk factors?
  • Have questions regarding nutritional supplements?
  • Want to lower your cancer risk?
  • Need sports nutrition advice?

Science has yet to determine the “perfect diet”.  But, we are getting a better understanding of which foods offer the most benefit and which foods pose the greatest risk. And– exactly how protective certain foods can be. Americans still eat a hefty amount of low nutrient carbohydrates, putting a heavy burden on our pancreas and gut-  probably not designed for such consumption. 

Digestive Health Matters!

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Inflammation is a necessary defense response that our body uses to survive against any number of factors, including: physical injury, stress, toxins, poor diet etc.  Chronic inflammation, however, leads to chronic illness including an increased cancer risk.  Our GI tract, fat cells and vessels are all potential sites of inflammation. Digestive health is key to overall health and can be the red flag that links to other health problems. Refined foods, medications, stress and a sedentary lifestyle all can contribute to digestive troubles. A balance of all nutrients is important and looking at your carbohydrate intake is a good place to start.

Carbohydrates and You

Determining the amount and type of carbohydrates that best suits your heart, metabolism and GI tract can ultimately be of tremendous value to all systems in your body. Research is showing that the type of carbs and fiber is important to maintaining a healthy balance of organisms in your gut–which in turn helps keep other parts healthy.

How Do You Make the Changes in Lifestyle Needed?

Ultimately, it is your motivation that turns your good intentions into your success. Self-motivation, however, works even better with compassionate support and experienced up-to-date knowledge. With over 25 years in health care, Cindy sees first hand how food and lifestyle changes can have a tremendous impact on an individual’s quality of life. Cindy is a registered dietitian and a registered nurse with functional medicine training and an expertise in digestive and cardiovascular health, sports nutrition and preventive medicine.  Cindy can help you identify the changes needed, but perhaps most importantly, guide you through those changes, so that you will have the skills for a lifetime.  You will see noticeable differences in how you feel.

Schedule a consult

 

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Your health is worth an investment of knowledge and behavior change that you will have forever!  To learn more about Cindy see  Meet Cindy.

 

The purpose of this nutrition website and blog is solely educational.  The information included on this site is not a substitute for professional medical examination, diagnosis or treatment.  Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health care provider before altering your diet, changing your exercise regimen, starting any new treatment or making changes to existing treatment. If you believe you have a medical emergency, you should immediately call 911 or your physician.